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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: McPherson
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Page 2 of 4 showing 10 records of 32 total, starting on record 11
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Inman I.O.O.F. Hall

Picture of property 100 North Main
Inman (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Apr 15, 2011

Architect: McKinzie, J. D., builder
Area of Significance: meeting hall; library; commerce
Architectural Style(s): Italianate

Built in 1893, the I.O.O.F. Hall is the only two-story building in downtown Inman. It was constructed by McPherson builder J. D. McKinzie in the popular late Victorian-era Italianate style. As was typical of late nineteenth century downtown buildings, the first floor served as commercial space while the second floor was reserved for meeting space and social functions. Today, the Inman Public Library operates out of the first floor, while the second floor is unused. The building features a storefront on the west elevation and a smaller secondary storefront on the south-facing elevation. A decorative cornice sits atop the west and south walls. The building was nominated for its local significance in the areas of social history and architecture.



Johnson House

Picture of property 226 West Lincoln
Lindsborg (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Mar 19, 1998

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: single dwelling
Architectural Style(s): Second Empire



Kuns--Collier House

Picture of property 302 S. Walnut Street
McPherson (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Mar 8, 2006

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: single dwelling
Architectural Style(s): Tudor Revival; Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals



McPherson Community Building

Picture of property 122 E Marlin St.
McPherson (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Jun 29, 2018

Architect: Scamell, Ralph E.
Area of Significance: auditorium; sports facility
Architectural Style(s): Art Deco

Built in 1927 the McPherson Community Building is significant for its association with McPherson's entertainment and recreation history. Best remembered as the homecourt of the Gold Refiners, the building houses a gymnasium and a theater and provided space for the city’s first fire department. The Globe Refiners provided five team members to the 1936 US Olympic Basketball Team, who won the first gold medal awarded for basketball. The building served the community of McPherson as a gathering place for basketball games and plays, and until circa 1963, housed the city's fire department. The period of significance spans from the building's construction in 1927 to circa 1963 when the fire department moved out of the building, ending the continued historic use of this building.



McPherson County Courthouse

Picture of property northwest corner, Maple and Kansas
McPherson (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Nov 21, 1976

Architect: John Haskell
Area of Significance: courthouse
Architectural Style(s): Romanesque



McPherson Opera House

Picture of property 221 South Main
McPherson (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Mar 16, 1972

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: theater
Architectural Style(s): Queen Anne



North Gypsum Creek Truss Leg Bedstead Bridge

Picture of property Sioux Rd., 0.2 mi E of int with 24th Ave., 1.0 mi S and 2.8 mi. W of Roxbury
Roxbury vicinity (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register May 9, 2003

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: road-related
Architectural Style(s): Bridge
Thematic Nomination: Metal Truss Bridges in Kansas



Paint Creek Archeological Site

Picture of property Address Restricted
Lindsborg (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Jun 20, 1972

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: archaeological site; village site



P. J. Lindquist Building

Picture of property 118 S. Main Street
Lindsborg (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Jun 8, 2015

Architect: Unknown
Area of Significance: commerce
Architectural Style(s): Italianate

Swedish immigrant P.J. Lindquist commissioned the construction of this building in 1901 to house his tailor shop and an upper-floor living space. That year, Lindsborg led other McPherson County towns in investment in new commercial and residential building. Although the tailor shop was short-lived, the Lindquist family owned the building for 39 years. The family lived in the second-floor apartment for many years, apparently after closing the tailor shop. Other businesses, such as the Tea Cup Inn, subsequently occupied the commercial space. The Malm Brothers Painting Company, reportedly packed and shipped stencils from this building, and this remains under investigation. One interior wall provides a vibrant stencil sample that may be the work of local artist Oscar Gunnarson, a partner in the Malm Company. The building is an excellent example of an early 20th century commercial building distinguished by Italianate-style details including the cast-iron storefront and tall second-story windows with ornate metal hoods. Although the building has housed multiple tenants on both floors over the years, it retains a high degree of integrity. It was nominated for its local significance in the areas of commerce and architecture.



Power Plant No. 1

Picture of property 414 W. Elizabeth
McPherson (McPherson County)
Listed in National Register Oct 10, 2007

Architect: Not listed
Area of Significance: public works
Architectural Style(s): Art Deco

McPherson was founded in 1872 and rapidly grew with the expansion of the Santa Fe and Union Pacific Railroads into a community with industry, business, and entertainment. This growth relied on power. Using coal for fuel, the Power Plant #1 (1934-1947) produced steam power. By 1927, the plant had converted to oil as its source of fuel. The architectural firms of Burns and McDonnell Engineering of Kansas City and Laramore and Douglass, Inc. of Chicago designed the power plant. It is nominated for its architectural significance as a good example of the Art Deco style executed on an industrial building.



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